Author Archives: yelda.nasifoglu

About yelda.nasifoglu

PhD candidate in the History and Theory of Architecture at McGill University & one of the editors of the web source 'Robert Hooke's Books' (www.hookesbooks.com).

Early Modern volvelles from the Bodleian (part I)

First page of a 15th-century guidebook on constructing volvelles, and some Early Modern ones, reproduced here with the kind permission of The Bodleian Libraries, The University of Oxford.

You may click on any one of the images to view a slideshow with further information, including the manuscript and folio numbers. As these are simple snapshots I took of the manuscripts, you are encouraged to contact the Imaging Services of the Bodleian Libraries directly to obtain professional reproductions.

Please note that MS Savile 100, f.8r has also been reproduced on the LUNA site of the Bodleian Libraries. See also the late 15th-century brass equatorium and astrolabe at the Museum of the History of Science at Oxford (inventory #49847).

Yelda Nasifoglu

Early Modern volvelles from the Bodleian (part II)

Illustrations from a late 14th century manuscript by Nicholas of Lynn, reproduced here with the kind permission of The Bodleian Libraries, The University of Oxford.

You may click on any one of the images to view a slideshow with further information, including the manuscript and folio numbers. As these are simple snapshots I took of the manuscripts, you are encouraged to contact the Imaging Services of the Bodleian Libraries directly to obtain professional reproductions. 

Please note that MS Ashmole 789 f.365r has also been produced on the LUNA site of the Bodleian Libraries.

Select sources on Nicholas of Lynn:

Other sources:

Yelda Nasifoglu

LIBESKIND’S MACHINES

Reblogged from the late Lebbeus Woods’s site.

LEBBEUS WOODS

By the mid-1980s, the reputation of Daniel Libeskind as a leading avant-garde figure in architecture was rapidly rising. This was based on his work as a teacher—he was director and principal teacher at the Cranbrook Academy School of Architecture from 1978 to 1985, establishing it as one of the most creative schools in the world—and on the publication and exhibition of a number of projects that, on their face, seemed to have little to do with architecture. Notable among these were his Memory Machine, Reading Machine, and Writing Machine.

Elaborately constructed and enigmatic in purpose, Libeskind’s machines are striking and sumptuous manifestations of ideas that were, at the time he made them, of obsessive interest to academics, critics and avant-gardists in architecture and out. Principal among these was the idea that architecture must be read, that is, understood, in the same way as a written text.

The chief structural features…

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